Wednesday, April 1, 2009

Best High Yield Dividend Stocks for 2009-1Q Update

Back in December 2008 several US and Canadian Bloggers provided four of their best stock picks for 2009. The rules of the stock-picking contest do not allow actively trading stocks. The performance of the individual bloggers’ picks is reviewed every quarter.
You might recall that I selected four high yielding dividend stocks from different sectors which I believed have sustainable dividend payments for 2009. Check out my original post for the rationale behind my picks.

Realty Income (O) closed 2008 at $23.15. At the current price of $18.82 plus the $0.42525 in distributions collected during the first quarter the investment in the owner of commercial retail real estate properties in the US is underwater by 16.90%. This dividend achiever, which has consistently increased its distributions multiple times/year since 1994, currently spots a very attractive 9.50% yield. Check out my analysis of Realty Income.

Kinder Morgan Energy Partners (KMP) finished 2008 at $45.75. At the current price of $46.72 plus the $1.05 in distributions collected during the first quarter the investment in the owner of energy transportation and storage assets in the US is up by 4.40%. This dividend achiever, which has consistently increased its distributions several times/year since 1997, currently spots a very appealing 9.00% yield. Check out my analysis of Kinder Morgan.

Consolidated Edison (ED) ended 2008 at $38.93. At the current price of $39.61 plus the $0.59 in dividends collected during the first quarter the investment in this provider electric, gas, and steam utility services has gained 3.30%. This dividend aristocrat, which has consistently increased its distributions several times/year since 1975, currently spots an attractive 6.10% yield. Check out my analysis of Consolidated Edison.

Phillip Morris International (PM) finished the year at $43.51. At the current price of $35.58 plus the $0.54 in dividends collected during the first quarter the investment in manufacturer of cigarettes and other tobacco products in markets outside of the United States of America is underwater by 17%. This dividend stock currently spots an attractive 5.60% yield.

Overall the four dividend stocks that I picked lost 8.30% so far in the first quarter of 2009; if you add in the dividends received over the first quarter of the year the total return improves to a negative 6.50%. In comparison S&P 500 lost 11.25% in the first quarter of 2009.

Check out the performance of the other bloggers year to date returns in the table below:

Rank

1 Intelligent Speculator 4.33%

2 The Financial Blogger -0.94%

3 FourPillars -2.67%

4 Million Dollar Journey -2.96%

5 Dividend Growth Investor -8.27%

6 WildInvestor -8.90%

7 Wheredoesallmymoneygo -21.77%

8 ZachStocks -24.19%

9 My Traders Journal -27.54%

I would like to reiterate the fact that in order to generate dividend income for the long run, a more diversified portfolio consisting of at least 30 stocks should be constructed. Check out the Best Dividend Stock for the Long Run list, which is a good addition to today's post.

Full Disclosure: Long ED, KMP, O, and PM

Relevant Articles:

- Best High Yield Dividend Stocks for 2009
- Best Dividends Stocks for the Long Run
- Kinder Morgan Energy Partners (KMP) Dividend Analysis
- Realty Income (O) Dividend Analisys
- Consolidated Edison (ED) Dividend Analysis

2 comments:

  1. You have over paid for many of your dividend growth stocks. P/E'sd of over 15 times have been to high to pay in the past.
    You said you would buy more pep at $68 or ko at $51. Both of these are down substantially.
    The price you pay matters...your entry price.

    ReplyDelete
  2. Anon,

    I dollar cost average my way into my positions. I bought PEP at 68 all the way down to $45 for example. I will not be the one to buy at the bottom, because noone can do that. Entry price matters..But what ultimately cuonts is the price when you exit decades from now.. If PEP trades at $400/share split adjusted 20 years from now it won't matter as much whether I bought it at 68 or 50. Academicians would say that with hindsight my buying at 68 was wrong and I should have waited.. But then I am in this to generate dividend income, not write academic papers about it..

    ReplyDelete

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