Saturday, May 31, 2014

Best Dividend Investing Articles for May 2014

For your weekend reading enjoyment, I have highlighted a few interesting articles from the archives, which I find to be relevant today. The first five articles have been written and posted on this site, while the last five have been selected from other authors. I tend to post anywhere between three to four articles to my site every week. I usually try to write at least one or two articles that contain timeless information concerning dividend investing. This could include information about my strategy, or other pieces of information, which could be useful to dividend investors.
Below, I have highlighted a few articles posted on this site, which many readers have found interesting:

1) Generate a retirement paycheck with these dividend paying stocks

I believe that living off dividends in retirement is a more sustainable way that selling off portions of your portfolio. I highlight several quality companies which I believe to be good values today, and which have good prospects for long term growth.

2) Should I buy more high yielding stocks in order to retire early?

In this article, I am debating whether it makes sense to focus more on higher yielding companies, in order to retire early. I share why I am building my portfolio the way I am today, and also discuss how I evaluate risk in dividend investing.

3) Dividend Investing During the Financial Crisis

I discuss the lessons I learned from the Financial Crisis of 2007 - 2009. As a result of those lessons, I believe that my dividend portfolio is in much better position to withstand the next calamity on the horizon.

4) Dollar Cost Averaging Versus Lump Sum Investing

In this article, I compare dollar cost averaging to lump sum investing. The results from the data I used are really telling, and supporting something I have done with my money over the past seven years. Check the article to find out which method is favored by my analysis of the data.

5) Personal Dividend objectives versus the market environment

Investors cannot expect to construct unrealistic portfolios while having only their own goals and objectives in mind. Instead, investors need to realistically focus on what the market offers right now, and make the best out of it. Imposing your will on market will likely lead to disappointment down the road.

I read a lot about companies, and also read a lot of interesting articles from all over the web. A few that I really enjoyed over the past months include:

6) Notes from the 2014 Berkshire Hathaway Meeting

Warren Buffett is the best investor in the world. In May, tens of thousands of Berkshire Hathaway shareholders went to hear him talk about business. The notes from the meeting are available from that link above.

7) If I Were Starting All Over Again

Jason from Dividend Mantra discusses the steps he would take to become financially independent, if he were starting all over again. This article is helpful for those who are about to begin their journey to financial independence, as well as those who are already on their way of achieving their goals.

8) Dividend Income Progress Update - April 2014

Dividends4life has been publicly tracking his dividend income every month since 2007.  He has some pretty high goals for annual dividend income by 2027.  He is crushing it currently with his dividend income, which is due to the fact that he saves money consistently, follows a disciplined approach to investing and monitors his positions in the process.

9) 22 Dividend Bloggers Share Their Top Investing Advice

Blogger Dan Mac reached out to 22 authors of dividend investing sites, and asked them for their best advice for beginner investors. I was included in this poll as well, but I am including this article because I really believe it could add value for those of you who are just starting out.

10) Four Key Dividend Metrics You Need to Know

Dividend Ninja shares four metrics that he finds to be helpful in evaluating dividend paying stocks. Those include dividend yield, dividend payout ratio, debt to equity and profit margin.


Thank you for reading Dividend Growth Investor site. I am also on Twitter, if you are interested in following me on another platform, where I post about recent trades I have made.

7 comments:

  1. DGI,

    Thanks for highlighting my article. Much appreciated!

    Hope you're enjoying your weekend thus far. It's beautiful weather where I'm at. :)

    Best wishes!

    ReplyDelete
  2. Thanks for sharing this list. Some good weekend reads.

    ReplyDelete
  3. I am reading the note from the Berkshire meeting and realize that I need to brush up on basic principles of corporate finance. Can you recommend a good text book? I studied the topic some 25 years ago in graduate school, but like any skill or knowledge that goes unused, it eventually atrophies and dies. Thanks in advance.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I have a list of a few books I like interesting, which you can check here:

      http://www.dividendgrowthinvestor.com/2013/11/these-books-shaped-my-investing-strategy.html

      Good luck!

      Dividend Growth Investor

      Delete
  4. Let's say a person can easily live off of 1% of his portfolio each year. The current yield of the SP500 of around 2% would provide approximately double the required income. In this instance, does it still make sense for this investor to assemble a portfolio of dividend paying stocks rather than simply invest in a low expense index fund? Also, assume the investment assets are in taxable accounts. The investment account assets would likely be passed to heirs either as gifts or as inheritances.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Your question is not a realistic scenario for 99.99999999% of dividend investors out there. Even if I could live off 1% of my portfolio, I would still create my own portfolio.

      Best Regards,

      DGI

      Delete
    2. True. I was thinking about the complexities and adverse consequences of passing a dividend portfolio on to successive generations, especially to those who may not have the ability or desire to manage it.

      Delete

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