Showing posts with label dividend stock. Show all posts
Showing posts with label dividend stock. Show all posts

Wednesday, May 5, 2010

Are Dividend Investors Stock Pickers?

My approach is to try and identify the best dividend stocks for the long term, and then dollar cost average my way into the position. I have had my fair share of dividend cutters however, which have resulted in reductions in dividend income. General Electric (GE) and American Capital (ACAS) are two examples where I suffered losses and declines in dividend income. I realize that no matter how good or bad of a stock picker I am, things could change and thus even the best plan could fail accordingly.

In order to minimize the risk of decreases in my dividend income, I have established several controls. Today I will discuss my views on diversification.

I like to keep a diversified portfolio of at least 30 dividend stocks. These stocks should be representative of several industries, in order to avoid weakness particular to specific sectors such as financials for example. The dividend aristocrats’ index is a good place to start looking for income investments because it is more industry diversified. By keeping at least 30 stocks my portfolio will be more likely than not to show returns similar to what the market would return. Just because I am a dividend investor does not mean that I don’t want to have any capital gains however. Quite on the contrary, dividend yields between 2% and 4% are sustainable if coupled with dividend growth potential. Thus I would expect prices to increase in order to maintain the current yield low and prevent most investors from realizing that yield on cost would be higher in the future.

Anyone who believes that a concentrated portfolio of 10- 15 stocks is the way to beat the market and has some success with it is probably playing with chance. Such a portfolio might return more than the averages initially, but sooner or later odds are that returns would get closer to index returns. Another problem with concentrated portfolios is the variability in total returns, relative to a portfolio of over 30 stocks. If all your stocks yielded 4% and you have one dividend eliminator and no increases, your dividend income would fall by 6.67% for the concentrated portfolio and 3.33% for the more diversified one. Thus, you would need portfolio dividend growth of 7.1% just to return to the same income level as before the dividend cut, leaving little room for keeping up with inflation. With a more diversified portfolio on the other hand you only need a 3.40% increase.

The problem with a more diversified portfolio is keeping track of more stocks. If one could easily learn everything about 10 – 15 stocks, then learning about 30+ stocks would probably take twice as much time. The solution is that most quality dividend stocks are characterized by strong competitive advantages, which are prevalent for many years if not decades. While keeping abreast of all developments is important, most of these developments would not have a material impact on the company in the long term. Examples include quarterly earnings and most news about companies. Thus, once you learn about particular companies, you could then spend more time learning about other stocks.

Another problem with a more diversified portfolio is that sometimes it is difficult to find thirty quality dividend stocks which are all trading at attractive valuations. Over the past two years this has not been a problem however, because of the bear market we have been experiencing. In retrospect however, building a quality dividend portfolio does take time. Thus, by starting small and initiating a position in as many attractively valued stocks as possible by dollar cost averaging your way into the position over time and looking for beaten down stocks, one could build a diversified portfolio consisting of over 30 stocks easily. I currently own 38 dividend stocks, and I am planning on expanding this number over time. In future articles I would be specifically addressing my portfolio.

Some of the greatest dividend stocks out there which are perfect building blocks for a dividend portfolio include:

Abbott (ABT) manufactures and sells health care products worldwide. The company operates through four segments: Pharmaceutical Products, Diagnostic Products, Nutritional Products and Vascular Products. Abbott Laboratories has increased dividends for 38 years in a row. The stock yields 3.40%. The yield on cost on stock purchased at the end of 1989 is 37%. (analysis)

Clorox (CLX) engages in the production, marketing, and sales of consumer products in the United States and internationally. The company operates through four segments: Cleaning, Lifestyle, Household, and International. Clorox has paid uninterrupted dividends on its common stock since it was spun out of Procter and Gamble (PG) in 1968 and increased payments to common shareholders every year for 32 years. The stock yields 3.10%.The yield on cost on stock purchased at the end of 1989 is 19%. (analysis)

Chevron Corporation (CVX) operates as an integrated energy company worldwide. The company is a dividend achiever, which has consistently boosted dividends for 22 consecutive years. The stock yields 3.50%. The yield on cost on stock purchased at the end of 1989 is 17%.(analysis)

Johnson & Johnson (JNJ) engages in the research and development, manufacture, and sale of various products in the health care field worldwide. The company operates through three segments: Consumer, Pharmaceutical, Medical Devices and Diagnostics. Johnson & Johnson has consistently increased dividends for 46 years in a row. The stock yields 3.40%. The yield on cost on stock purchased at the end of 1989 is 29.10%. (analysis)

PepsiCo (PEP) manufactures, markets, and sells various snacks, carbonated and non-carbonated beverages, and foods worldwide. PepsiCo has been raising dividends for 38 consecutive years. The stock yields 2.80%. The yield on cost on stock purchased at the end of 1989 is 16.90%.(analysis)

These high yields on cost are not incidental. Most of the original Dividend Aristocrats from 1989 are generating substantial yields on cost even after they stopped raising distributions consistently.

Full Disclosure: Long ABT, CLX, CVX, JNJ, PEP

Relevant Articles:

- Dividend Portfolios – concentrate or diversify?
- Dividend Aristocrats List for 2010
- Capital gains for dividend investors
- Not all dividend stocks are overvalued

Wednesday, April 7, 2010

Three Dividend Strategies to pick from

Most new investors typically tend to focus on the companies with the highest dividend yields. I am often being asked why I never write about companies such as Hatteras Financial (HTS) or American Agency (AGNC), each of which yields 16% and 19% respectively. While some of my holdings are higher yielding companies, I typically tend to invest in stocks with strong competitive advantages, which have achieved a balance between the need to finance their growth and the need to pay their shareholders.
After looking at my portfolio, I have been able to identify three types of dividend stocks.

The first type is high yield stocks with low to no dividend growth.

Realty Income (O) (analysis)

Enbridge Energy Partners (EEP)

Kinder Morgan Partner (KMP) (analysis)

Consolidated Edison (ED) (analysis)

It is important not to fall in the trap of excessive high yields, caused by the market’s perceptions that the dividend is in peril. Recent examples of this included some of the financial companies such as Bank of America (BAC). While current dividend income is important, these stocks would produce little in capital gains over time.

The second type is low yielding stocks with a high dividend growth rate.

Wal-Mart (WMT) (analysis)

Aflac (AFL) (analysis)

Colgate Palmolive (CL) (analysis)

Archer Daniels Midland (ADM) (analysis)

Family Dollar (FDO) (analysis)

One of the issues with this type of strategy is that it might take a longer time to achieve a decent yield on cost on your investment. It is difficult to achieve a double digit dividend growth rate forever. Once you achieve an adequate yield on cost on your investment, it might slow down dividend increases. The positive side of this strategy is that many of the best dividend growth stocks such as Wal-Mart (WMT) or McDonald’s (MCD) never really yielded more than 2%-3% when they first joined the Dividend Achievers index. The main positive of this strategy is the possibility of achieving strong capital gains.

The third type is represented by companies with an average yield and an average dividend growth. Some investors call this the sweet spot of dividend investing.

Johnson & Johnson (JNJ) (analysis)

Procter & Gamble (PG) (analysis)

Clorox (CLX) (analysis)

Pepsi Co (PEP) (analysis)

Automatic Data Processing (ADP) (analysis)

There is a common misconception that buying the stocks in the middle, would produce average returns. Actually finding stocks with average market yields, which also produce a good dividend growth could produce not only exceptional yield on cost faster, but also capital gains as well.

At the end of the day successful dividend investing is much more than finding the highest yielding stocks. It is more about finding the stocks with sustainable competitive advantages which allow them to enjoy strong earnings growth, which would be the foundation of sustainable dividend growth. A company like Procter & Gamble (PG) which yields almost 3% today butraises dividends at 10% annually would double your yield on cost in 7 years to 6%. A company like Con Edison (ED) would likely yield around 6% on cost in 7 years. The main difference would be capital gains – Procter & Gamble (PG) would likely still yield 3%, while Con Edison (ED) would likely yield 6%. Thus the investor in Procter & Gamble would have most likely doubled their money in less than a decade, while also enjoying a rising stream of dividend income.

Full Disclosure: Long all stocks mentioned in the article except HTS and AGNC

This article was included in the Carnival of Personal Finance #252: Famous People With Tax Troubles Edition

Relevant Articles:

- 2010’s Top Dividend Plays
- Six Dividend Stocks for current income
- Best Dividends Stocks for the Long Run
- Capital gains for dividend investors
- Dividend Growth beats Dividend Yield in the long run

Friday, March 26, 2010

Emerson Electric (EMR) Dividend Stock Analysis

Emerson Electric Co., is a diversified global technology company, that engages in designing and supplying product technology, as well as delivering engineering services and solutions to various industrial, commercial, and consumer markets worldwide. The company is a member of the dividend aristocrat index, having raised distributions for 53 consecutive years.

Over the past decade this dividend growth stock has delivered an annual average total return of 7% to its shareholders. The stock is up almost 100% from its 2009 lows.


The company has managed to deliver a 3.60% average annual increase in its EPS between 2000 and 2009. Analysts are expecting an increase in EPS to $2.41 in 2010 and $2.90 by 2011, which would be an increase from FY 2009 EPS of $2.27. Short-term results showed that despite the diversified business conducted in five major segments, the company is not immune to cyclical movements in the overall economy. After steep declines in revenues in 2009, analysts expect Emerson to report flat revenues in FY 2010, followed by an increase as a result of the pickup in economic activity later this year. The company is focusing its long-term growth efforts in emerging markets, telecom and retail industries as well as services, power generation and process automation technologies as well as product innovation.


The Return on Equity has increased over the past decade from a low of 14.50% in 2000 to 19.50% in 2009. Rather than focus on absolute values for this indicator, I generally want to see at least a stable return on equity over time.

The annual dividend payment has increased by an average of 7% annually since 2000, which is slightly lower than the growth in EPS.


A 7 % growth in dividends translates into the dividend payment doubling every 10 years. If we look at historical data, going as far back as 1982, Emerson Electric Co. has actually managed to double its dividend payment every nine years on average.

The dividend payout ratio remained below 50% for the majority of the past decade. The only exception were the 2001-2003 and 2009 periods, because profitability suffered from economic downturns at the time. A lower payout is always a plus, since it leaves room for consistent dividend growth minimizing the impact of short-term fluctuations in earnings.


Currently Emerson Electric is trading at a Price to Earnings multiple of 21.50, yields 2.80% and has a dividend payout that is higher than 50%. Despite the fact that the company has a good business model, the stock is slightly overvalued at the moment. I would only add to my position in the stock on dips below $45.

Full Disclosure: Long EMR

Relevant Articles:

- Dividend Aristocrats List for 2010
- Ten Dividend Kings raising dividends for over 50 years
- Where are the original Dividend Aristocrats now?
- Estimating future Dividend Growth

Wednesday, March 17, 2010

The right time to buy dividend stocks

With the market getting overextended for several months now, and my unwillingness to chase many dividends stocks, it is time to reflect on whether I am doing the right thing or not. Some stocks such as Emerson Electric (EMR) and Realty Income (O) which I was going to add to either in March or in April are trading at valuations that seem richer than what I am willing to pay for at the time.

After writing dividend growth investor blog for over two years now, I have been able to observe investor reaction to my posts. My main source of ideas for improvement has always been with comments which offer some sort of criticism, be it constructive or not. It is understandable however that one cannot please everyone, and as a result I have pretty much kept at my ideas that dividend growth investing is a superior investing strategy for investors at all stages in their life. One of the largest criticisms that I often receive is from investors with a short-term vision in mind. Back in early 2008, the problem for owning US stocks was the weakening of the US dollar and the rise in oil prices. Somehow all commodity rich developing countries which were selling natural resources at inflated prices were being touted as the next big thing. Of course once the bubble collapsed in 2008, many countries such as Russia were hit hard and the lack of diversification in their economies was much evident.

Back in late 2008 and early 2009 most investors were constantly being bombarded with negative stories about the end of buy and hold and the death of dividend investing after a record number of dividend cuts occurred. Of course it is difficult to separate the short-term noise, from the long term story behind the economy or a particular business. The truth is that in order to be successful in investing, one should stick to a certain strategy through thick and thin. Thinking too often could cause investors to deviate from their plans, and suffer from consequences as a result. Famous speculator Jesse Livermore once said that money is made by sitting, not by thinking. It is uncommon to find men who are both right and sit tight as well.

The first few months of the bear market recovery that began in March 2009 were characterized by bears speculating about a double dip recession, nationalization of major banks etc. After a few months of stocks hitting new 52 week high however, the risk of missing out on the rally and having to pay higher prices in the future if money is not deployed now is increasing every day.

Warren Buffett had mentioned in one of his letter sto shareholders that he would rather buy an excellent business at a fair price, rather than purchase a lousy business at a fire sale price. Speaking of the two companies I mentioned above, I have to decide whether they are excellent business trading at rich valuation, or whether they represent average businesses trading at inflated prices.

My strategy for my dividend portfolio is to dollar cost average my way into approximately ten stocks per month, reinvesting dividends selectively and building a diversified portfolio.

The truth of the matter is that if I keep following my strategy, it shouldn’t really matter in the long run whether I purchased Emerson (EMR) at 45 or at 48. This should hold true as long as I do not have more than 3 or 4% allocated to that position and as long as the company is able to generate a sufficient enough earnings growth to power up the dividend hikes into the next decade. Time and again I have noticed how some of the best dividend growth stories ever such as Gillette, Geico, Wal-Mart (WMT) or McDonald’s (MCD) didn’t yield much, yet they had outstanding competitive advantages and solid dividend and earnings growth. Currently Emerson Electric (EMR) and Realty Income (O) offer their lowest yields in many months, which coupled with the low dividend growth as of lately make them a pass until the next dip in prices. However, given the fact that there is seldom any “perfect time” to deploy cash, I would definitely add to those two positions on the next dip.

This article was included in the Carnival Of Personal Finance #249: Who’s Awesomest? Pirates Vs Ninjas Vs Nuns Vs Robots Vs Real Estate Agents Vs Zombiess

Full Disclosure: Long EMR, MCD, O and WMT

Relevant Articles:

- Realty Income (O) Dividend Stock Analysis
- Ten Dividend Kings raising dividends for over 50 years
- Buffett the dividend investor
- Should you re-invest your dividends?

Friday, February 26, 2010

Colgate-Palmolive (CL) Dividend Stock Analysis

Colgate-Palmolive Company (CL), together with its subsidiaries, manufactures and markets consumer products worldwide. It operates in two segments, Oral, Personal, and Home Care; and Pet Nutrition. The company recently increased its quarterly dividend by 20.40% to 53 cents/share. This is the forty-seventh consecutive dividend increase for Colgate-Palmolive, which is a dividend champion.


Over the past decade this dividend stock has returned 4.30% per annum.

Earnings per share have increased by 11.10% on average since 2000. Since 2000 the number of shares outstanding has decreased from 625 million to 525 million, or an average decrease of 1.90% annually. Analysts estimate that EPS would grow by 9.80% to $4.80 in FY 2010. FY 2011 EPS are expected to increase by 11.40% from there to $5.35.

Sales outside North America accounted for two-thirds of the company’srevenues. The company’s strong competitive advantages in the oral healthcare field plus the low capital requirements have enabled it to generate high returns on capital.

Returns on Equity have been truly phenomenal, having never fallen below 80% since 2000.

Annual dividends have increased by 11.80% on average over the past decade, which is slightly higher than the growth in earnings.

A 12 % growth in dividends translates into the dividend payment doubling every six years on average. If we look at historical data, going as far back as 1976, Colgate Palmolive has actually managed to double its dividend payment every eight and a half years on average.

The dividend payout ratio has consistently remained below 50%, with the exception of a brief spike to 50.80% in 2006. A lower payout is always a plus, since it leaves room for consistent dividend growth minimizing the impact of short-term fluctuations in earnings.

The company trades at a P/E of 18.80 times earnings and has an adequately covered dividend payment. The current yield of 2.60% is below my 3% entry threshold. If we look at the yield from the past decade however, CL has yielded more than 3% only during the lows in early 2009. Because of this I initiated a position in Colgate recently. I would look forward to add to this position on dips below $71, which would be my ideal entry price.

Full Disclosure: Long CL
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Wednesday, February 17, 2010

Ten Dividend Kings raising dividends for over 50 years

Many dividend investors focus on the dividend aristocrats, the dividend champions and the dividend achievers lists, as a starting point in their research. While most investors picture dividend stocks as slow growth and boring utility stocks, the three lists portray a different perspective. The dividend achievers list, which focuses on companies which have raised distributions for at least 10 consecutive years, consists of slightly less than 300 individual issues representing almost all industry groups out there. The dividend aristocrats list, which features companies which have boosted distributions for over a quarter of a century, is also sector-diversified. The dividend champions list also focuses on companies which have raised distributions for over a quarter of a century. I find the champions list more inclusive, whereas the aristocrats list has not included certain companies despite the fact that they have increased distributions for over 25 years in a row. Sometimes it is challenging to determine the actual record of dividend raises, especially when two companies merge.

I was amazed to find several companies on the champions list, which have raised distributions for over 50 consecutive years. The companies include:

Diebold (DBD) engages in the development, manufacture, sale, installation, and service of automated self-service transaction systems, electronic and physical security systems, and election systems and software worldwide. The company recently boosted its dividend for the 57th year in a row. Yield 3.70%.

American States Water Company (AWR), through its subsidiaries, provides water and electric utility services to residential and commercial customers in the United States. The company engages in the purchase, production, and distribution of water. The company has raised distributions for 55 years in a row. Yield 3.20%.

Dover Corporation (DOV), together with its subsidiaries, manufactures industrial products and components, as well as provides related services and consumables in the United States and internationally. Dover has raised its payout for 54 consecutive years. Yield 3.20%.(analysis)

Northwest Natural Gas Company (NWN), doing business as NW Natural, engages in the storage and distribution of natural gas in Oregon, Washington and California. The company operates in two segments, Local Gas Distribution and Gas Storage. This utility company has increased dividends for 54 years in a row. Yield 3.90%.

Genuine Parts Company (GPC) distributes automotive and industrial replacement parts, office products, and electrical/electronic materials in the United States, Canada, and Mexico. It has four segments: Automotive, Industrial, Office Products, and Electrical/Electronic Materials. The company has consistently boosted dividends for 53 years in a row. Yield 4.20%.

The Procter & Gamble Company (PG) engages in the manufacture and sale of consumer goods worldwide. The company operates in three global business units (GBUs): Beauty, Health and Well-Being, and Household Care. The company has increased dividends for 53 years in a row. Yield 2.80%. (analysis)

Emerson Electric Co. (EMR), a diversified global technology company, engages in designing and supplying product technology, as well as delivering engineering services and solutions to various industrial, commercial, and consumer markets worldwide. Yield 2.90%. (analysis)

3M Company, (MMM) together with its subsidiaries, operates as a diversified technology company worldwide. It operates in six segments: Industrial and Transportation; Health Care; Safety, Security and Protection Services; Consumer and Office; Display and Graphics; and Electro and Communications. The company has raised distributions for 51 years in a row. Yield 2.70%.(analysis)

Integrys Energy Group, Inc. (TEG), through its subsidiaries, operates as a regulated electric and natural gas utility company in the United States and Canada. This utility company has increased dividends for 51 years in a row. Yield 6.60%.

Vectren Corporation (VVC) provides energy delivery services to residential, commercial, and industrial and other customers in Indiana and Ohio. This utility company has increased dividends for 50 years in a row. Yield 6.00%.

I did check with the Moody’s dividend achievers handbook and each company’s website in order to confirm whether the companies have actually raised distributions for 50 years in a row. I didn’t include Parker-Hannifin Corporation (PH), despite the fact that it was on the champions list, because it failed to increase dividends in 1991.

Just because a company has raised distributions for 50 years does not necessarily mean that it would continue raising them for over a decade. Back in early 2000’s Winn-Dixie (WINN) had the longest record of dividend increases, after boosting its payout for over 56 years. The company was losing market share however and was heavily leveraged, which ultimately lead to its filing for chapter 11 protection and wiping out all shareholders equity in the process.

The positive factor in the story is that there is a chance that some of the best dividend stocks of today which are included in the dividend achievers or the dividend aristocrats lists could end up raising distributions for 40 more years. Even if a company drops from one of those elite dividend indexes, it typically does so either because it is acquired by a competitor at a handsome premium or because it simply freezes distributions. Kellogg’s (K) is a nice example of a company which had raised distributions for over 44 years, before freezing distributions in 2001. The company then started raising distributions again in 2005 and has been boosting its payout ever since.

Full Disclosure: Long EMR, MMM, PG,

Relevant Articles:

- Utility dividends for current income
- Dividends Stocks versus Fixed Income
- Estimating future Dividend Growth
- Where are the original Dividend Aristocrats now?

Friday, February 12, 2010

Diageo (DEO) Dividend Stock Analysis

Diageo plc (DEO) engages in producing, distilling, brewing, bottling, packaging, distributing, developing, and marketing spirits, beer, and wine. The company offers a range of premium brands comprising Smirnoff vodka, Johnnie Walker scotch whiskies, Captain Morgan rum, Baileys Original Irish Cream liqueur, J&B scotch whisky, Tanqueray gin, and Guinness stout. Diageo is an international dividend achiever, which has raised distributions for over a decade.

The company has delivered annualized total returns of 12.4% on average.

Earnings per share have increased by 10% on average since 2000. EPS growth has been aided by a decade of share buybacks, which shrank the number of outstanding stock by a quarter. Emerging markets account for one third of company’s revenues. This is where many brand name consumer companies are currently experiencing growth. In 2009 Diageo earned $4.14/share. Analysts expect the company to earn $4.62 and $5.04 per share in 2010 and 2011 respectively.

The annual dividend payment has been increased by 6.80% on average, which is lower than the growth in EPS.

Return on equity has increased from 22.30% at the beginning of the study period to a very impressive 42% in 2009.

The dividend payout ratio has been volatile, and largely remaining above 50% during our study period. Currently this indicator sits at 55%.

Diageo currently trades at a P/E of 16, yields 4.20% but has a dividend payout ratio of 55%, which is a little bit higher for my taste. Other than that I like the company, the strong brand names it owns and its ability to raise dividends through thick and thin. I never really pulled the trigger on Diageo (DEO) since I analyzed it in 2008. I would try to initiate a position in the company on dips as soon as I have funds available.

Full Disclosure: None
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Thursday, February 4, 2010

Dividend Investors are getting paid for waiting

Many investors believe that successful dividend investing consists of identifying the highest yielding stocks in the market and then generating double digit returns on investment each year. The problem with this strategy it that it often overlooks the fact that such dividend yields are most often unsustainable in the long run. A much better strategy that could eventually produce double digit yield on cost to investors is dividend growth investing. Using this strategy a patient investor accumulates a diversified portfolio of stocks which have a long history of consistently growing dividends. The positive factor is that any investor can implement this strategy, especially now that brokerage commissions are almost zero.

Dividend investors are paid for holding common stocks, which is one reason why a company which keeps paying a stable or rising dividend does not fall as much during bear market declines. The dividend returns are always positive, which provides a safety cushion even in the worst times possible. Furthermore dividends cannot be faked, whereas earnings could be massaged within certain limits in order to reach performance targets that are not economically prudent.
This return can be reinvested which further magnifies long-term income growth as well as total returns. Companies that raise dividends also provide a tangible proof that companies do have the cashflows to pay them. A company which does not have a solid business model typically cannot afford to raise dividends for more than a few years.

Paying dividends also imposes a discipline upon companies, which restricts excessive empire building or "diworsification" through overpriced acquisitions. Opponents of dividend investing often claim that dividend stocks are boring and slow moving, and instead recommend purchasing fast growing rising stars, which reinvest everything back in their business. While re-investing back into the business is a good idea, expanding too rapidly might lead to excessive leverage build up with disastrous consequences for the owners of the business. Any solid company should be able to balance its capital investment needs with its shareholders demands for returns on their investment. Successful companies such as McDonald’s (MCD) and Wal-Mart (WMT) have not only grown their business in a smart way, but have also rewarded shareholders consistently as well.

Currently, the market is a little overextended off of its March lows. Many investors are wondering whether they should cash out or keep adding to their positions. Dividend investors on the other hand have the luxury to ignore market movements as long as distributions are intact and growing. After all solid companies with definite competitive advantages which throw off rising dividend payments each year do not lose their moats overnight. Such companies include Johnson & Johnson (JNJ), Procter and Gamble (PG), Chevron Corporation (CVX), Pepsi Co (PEP) and McDonald’s (MCD).

The Procter & Gamble Company (PG), together with its subsidiaries, provides branded consumer goods products worldwide. The company operates in three global business units (GBU): Beauty, Health and Well-Being, and Household Care. Procter & Gamble is a dividend aristocrat as well as a component of the S&P 500 index. One of its most prominent investors includes the legendary Warren Buffett. Procter & Gamble has been increasing its dividends for the past 53 consecutive years. (analysis)

McDonald’s Corporation (MCD), together with its subsidiaries, franchises and operates McDonald’s restaurants in the food service industry worldwide. The company's share of the US fast food market is several times larger than its closest competitors, Burger King (BKC) and Wendy's (WEN). McDonald’s is a major component of the S&P 500 and Dow Industrials indexes. The company is also a dividend aristocrat, which has been consistently increasing its dividends for 33 consecutive years. (analysis)

PepsiCo, Inc. (PEP) manufactures, markets, and sells various snacks, carbonated and non-carbonated beverages, and foods worldwide. PepsiCo is a major component of the S&P 500, Dow Industrials and the Dividend Aristocrats Indexes. PepsiCo has been consistently increasing its dividends for 37 consecutive years. (analysis)

Johnson & Johnson (JNJ) engages in the research and development, manufacture, and sale of various products in the health care field worldwide. Johnson & Johnson is a major component of the S&P 500, Dow Industrials and the Dividend Aristocrats Indexes. One of the company’s largest shareholders includes Warren Buffett. JNJ has been consistently increasing its dividends for 47 consecutive years. (analysis)

Chevron Corporation (CVX) operates as an integrated energy company worldwide. Chevron Corporation is a component of the S&P 500 and Dow Jones Industrials Indexes. The company is also a dividend achiever, which has been consistently increasing its dividends for 21 consecutive years. (analysis)

Full disclosure: Long CVX, JNJ, MCD, PEP and PG

Relevant Articles:

- Chevron Corporation (CVX) Dividend Stock Analysis

- Procter & Gamble (PG) Dividend Stock Analysis

- Dividend Investing vs Trading

- The Sweet Spot of Dividend Investing

Monday, January 11, 2010

Valuing Dividend Stocks

Few investors these days seem to grasp the idea that stocks represent fractional ownership of real businesses. This is especially difficult to understand as electronic trading has become widespread, and it is now possible to buy and sell stocks and derivatives on these equities within seconds from the comfort of your home. While as a dividend investor I typically look for stocks with a consistent stream of earnings, which translates into a long history of dividend growth, I am always on the lookout to learn something new as well.

While earnings power is essential, it is also important to understand that a business or its assets do have some value, whether as a whole or as a sum of its parts. Most of the times when there is a merger or an acquisition of a company, investors get a price for their holdings from the acquirer. Thus they are able to monetize their partial ownership rights, and their stocks rise in value in the process. Other times the market undervalues companies which hold on for too long to liquid assets, because of the fear that excess cash in the hands of management might not lead to improved financial condition over the long term.

One such company was Magic Software Enterprises Ltd. (MGIC). Magic Software Enterprises Ltd. is an Israeli company which develops, markets, and supports software development and deployment technology and applications. Back in December the company announced that its board of directors has declared a cash dividend in the amount of US$0.50 per share and in the aggregate amount of approximately US$16.0 million. The stock increased in value from $1.87 to $2.23/share after the announcement. The stock is already trading ex-dividend however, which means that investors who purchase the stock today would not be able to receive the special distribution.

At the end of the third quarter of 2009, Magic Software held cash and cash equivalents worth $36.85 million and had total liabilities worth $14.21 million. This was worth approximately 55 cents/share, and that’s without including any of the company’s receivables, fixed assets, intangible assets and the company’s ability to generate future earnings. In addition to that the company has been profitable in 2007 and 2008 and is on schedule to earn money in 2009. What might have triggered the need for special dividend was the sale of the company’s office building for $5.20 million in cash in early December 2009.

At the end of the day it is important to understand that stocks represent fractional ownership of real tangible businesses. An important component of success in investing is also finding the best opportunities at bargain prices as well in addition to diversification and dividend reinvestment. Thus I believe that even if we have another lost decade, there would be plenty of opportunities for investors to make money and for companies to unlock their intrinsic value through dividend raises or special dividends.

Some of the companies which have been able to create consistent value for shareholders over the past few decades include Automatic Data Processing (ADP) and Emerson Electric (EMR). Both stocks currently trade at attractive levels and have well-covered dividends.

Automatic Data Processing, Inc. (ADP) provides technology-based outsourcing solutions to employers, and vehicle retailers and manufacturers. It operates in three segments: Employer Services, Professional Employer Organization Services, and Dealer Services. This dividend aristocrat has raised dividends for 35 years in a row. The stock is trading at 16 times earnings and yields a comfortable 3.20%. The company has a ten year average dividend growth rate of 14.50% per year. Last year ADP raised distributions by only 3%. When the business recovers however, the company would be able to grow distributions in the low double digits. The book value of the assets is $11.23/share.(analysis)

Emerson Electric Co., (EMR) a diversified global technology company, engages in designing and supplying product technology, as well as delivering engineering services and solutions to various industrial, commercial, and consumer markets worldwide. This dividend aristocrat has boosted distributions for 53 consecutive years. The stock is trading at 19 times earnings and yields 3.10%. The company has a ten year average dividend growth rate of 6.50% per year. When the world economy recovers, the company’s diversified business operations should be able to support a dividend growth in the high single digits. The books value of the assets is $11.33/share.(analysis)

Full Disclosure: Long ADP and EMR

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- Special Dividends Unlock Hidden Value in Stocks
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- What Dividend Growth Investing is all about?
- 3 dividend increases, more expected in January

Wednesday, January 6, 2010

Five Consumer Stocks for 2010

With the expectations that the financial crisis appears to be over, investors have bid up stocks to the highest levels in over a year. There’s a lot of optimism in the news, including major banks repaying TARP money, unemployment stabilizing, and major economies rebounding. If economies rebound, then consumers would be able to start spending more on everyday items, trading up from generic brands to brand name products.

The companies which could benefit from this include Johnson & Johnson (JNJ), Procter & Gamble (PG), McDonald’s (MCD), Wal-Mart (WMT) and Coca Cola (KO). They all have durable competitive advantages, which has allowed each company to become a member of the elite dividend aristocrats index after raising distributions for over a quarter of a century.

The Coca-Cola Company (KO) manufactures, distributes, and markets nonalcoholic beverage concentrates and syrups worldwide. It principally offers sparkling and still beverages. The company has increased distributions for 47 consecutive years. I would be a buyer of KO below $54.66. Check my analysis of the stock.

Wal-Mart Stores, Inc. (WMT) operates retail stores in various formats worldwide. The world’s largest retailer has a 35 year record of annual dividend raises. I would be a buyer of WMT on dips. Check my analysis of the stock.

McDonald’s Corporation (MCD), together with its subsidiaries, franchises and operates McDonald’s restaurants in the food service industry worldwide. Its restaurants offer various food items, soft drinks, and coffee and other beverages. The golden arches has raised dividends for 33 years. I would be a buyer of MCD as long as it trades below $73. Check my analysis of the stock.

Johnson & Johnson (JNJ) engages in the research and development, manufacture, and sale of various products in the health care field worldwide. The company has boosted distributions to shareholders for 47 years in a row. I would be a buyer of JNJ below $65.33. Check my analysis of the stock.

The Procter & Gamble Company (PG) engages in the manufacture and sale of consumer goods worldwide. The company operates in three global business units (GBUs): Beauty, Health and Well-Being, and Household Care. The company has rewarded stockholders with dividend increases for 53 consecutive years. I would be a buyer of PG below $58.67. Check my analysis of the stock.

Even if the recovery is characterized by lower consumer participation, these stocks should benefit, particularly because their revenue streams are stable and globally diversified. A decline in the stock market would present a great opportunity to initiate or add to positions in the global powerhouses.

Full Disclosure: I have positions in every company listed above

Relevant Articles:

- Dividend Aristocrats List for 2010
- McDonald’s (MCD) Dividend Stock Analysis
- TARP is bad for dividend investors
- Six things I learned from the financial crisis

Friday, December 18, 2009

Stanley Works (SWK) Dividend Stock Analysis

The Stanley Works manufactures tools and engineered security solutions worldwide. The company, which has raised dividends for 42 consecutive years, is a member of the S&P Dividend Aristocrats index.

Since 1999 this dividend stock has delivered an average total return of 8.10% annually.

The company has managed to deliver a 6% average annual increase in its EPS between 1999 and 2008. Analysts expect Stanley Works to earn $2.42 share next year, followed by an increase to $3.06/share in the year after that. Back in November 2009, Stanley Works announced its intent to acquire Black & Decker (BDK) in an all stock deal subject to regulatory and shareholder approvals. The combined companies could realize significant synergies and enjoy a wider product base with little overlap between the two businesses. In addition to that the company is in the process of eliminating 10% of its staff, which could help offset weaker sales this year.

Return on Equity has fluctuated widely between 9% and 21% over the past decade. This indicator has spend of the time in the high teen’s however. Rather than focus on absolute values for this indicator, I generally want to see at least a stable return on equity over time.

Annual dividends have increased by an average of 4.20% annually since 1999, which is much slower than the growth in EPS. A 4 % growth in dividends translates into the dividend payment doubling every eighteen years. If we look at historical data, going as far back as 1968, Stanley Works has actually managed to double its dividend payment every ten years on average.

The dividend payout ratio has consistently remained below 50% over the past five years. A lower payout is always a plus, since it leaves room for consistent dividend growth minimizing the impact of short-term fluctuations in earnings.

Currently the Stanley Works is overvalued at 22 times earnings, yields 2.70% and has an adequately covered distribution payment. Although the Black & Decker acquisition could be accretive to EPS, it could jeopardize the already weakened growth in distributions for Stanley Works such that the company freezes its payment for a few years. If it keeps raising distributions however I would look to enter a small position in Stanley Works (SWK) on dips below $44.

Full Disclosure: None

Wednesday, September 9, 2009

Not all dividend stocks are overvalued

While the market has enjoyed impressive gains ever since it hit a multi year low in March 2009, investors are beginning to get nervous about valuation. If valuation is too high, chances are that investors are overpaying for stocks purchased, which could lead to lower performance over time.
Luckily however, the rally off of March lows has been lead by speculative names from the financial sector. Most of the high quality names that dividend investors follow, such as Johnson & Johnson (JNJ) or Pepsi Cola (PEP), have mainly followed the market higher in its ascend. If we were truly in a new bull market however, then we should expect that most investors would switch to quality blue chip companies. Another positive part is that stock prices are still lower, in comparison to their levels in September 2008.

While entry price does matter, defensive dividend investors should also look at the dividend coverage and the company’s ability to grow the distributions over time. Only after these two prerequisites are met, should investors begin evaluating companies with at least a decade long histories of dividend increases on the basis of valuation.

A minimum requirement for yield should also provide an adequate margin of safety in dividend income to investors in the event that the timing of the purchase was not correct in the short term. Even if the stock price stays below the entry price of dividend investors for a prolonged period of time, they would still be in a position to get paid to hold the stock. Enterprising dividend investors might even be able to re-invest distributions at lower prices.
In addition to that, if the company manages to keep raising distributions even during economic downturns, then it should also be able to increase dividends during economic rebounds. Thus, one could reasonably expect that share prices would increase during a bull market.

I have listed several dividend stocks, which are not overstretched. They are mostly dividend achievers and aristocrats. These are some of the positions I have added to most recently.

Abbott Laboratories (ABT) manufactures and sells health care products worldwide. The company has raised dividends for 37 years in a row. Abbott currently trades at 13.30 times earnings and yields 3.50%, with an adequately covered dividend. (analysis)

Automatic Data Processing, Inc. (ADP) provides technology-based outsourcing solutions to employers, and vehicle retailers and manufacturers. It operates in three segments: Employer Services, Professional Employer Organization Services, and Dealer Services. The company has raised dividends for 34years in a row . Automatic Data Processing, Inc. currently trades at 14.70 times earnings and yields 3.40%, with a sufficiently covered dividend. (analysis)

The Clorox Company (CLX) engages in the production, marketing, and sales of consumer products in the United States and internationally. The company operates through four segments: Cleaning, Lifestyle, Household, and International. The company has raised dividends for 32 consecutive years. Clorox spots a P/E ratio of 15.50 and yields 3.40%. (analysis)

Emerson Electric Co.(EMR), a diversified global technology company, engages in designing and supplying product technology and delivering engineering services to various industrial and commercial, and consumer markets worldwide. Emerson Electric has raised dividends for a record 52 consecutive years. The company trades at 15.3 times earnings, has an adequately covered dividend and yields 3.50%. (analysis)

Johnson & Johnson (JNJ) engages in the research and development, manufacture, and sale of various products in the health care field worldwide. Johnson & Johnson has raised dividends for a very impressive 47 consecutive years. The company trades at 13.3 times earnings, has an adequately covered dividend and yields 3.20%. (analysis)

McDonald’s Corporation (MCD), together with its subsidiaries, franchises and operates McDonald’s restaurants in the food service industry worldwide. McDonald’s Corporation has raised dividends for 32 years in a row. The company currently trades at 14.90 times earnings , has a very well covered dividend payments and yields 3.60%. (analysis)

Just because a company has raised distributions for a long period of time however, this doesn’t mean that the current yield is going to be excessive. It is the fat yield on cost that long-term dividend investors are after. Also remember that companies cannot control its yield, which is a function of the stock price. Companies could however maintain a proactive dividend policy, where they strive to continuously raise distributions year in and year out.

Some dividend investors also completely ignore capital gains in the equation. While it is true that dividends typically account for 40% of the average annual stock market total returns, it is important to note that the remaining 60% have come from capital gains. The companies listed above not only have adequately covered dividend payments and decent current yields, but they also have strong capital appreciation characteristics.

Full Disclosure: Long ABT, ADP, CLX, EMR, JNJ, MCD and PEP

Relevant Articles:

- Six things I learned from the financial crisis
- Dividend Stocks Showing You the Money
- Dividend Reinvestment is important
- Reinvest Dividends Selectively

Friday, June 26, 2009

Coca Cola (KO) Dividend Stock Analysis

The Coca-Cola Company manufactures, distributes, and markets nonalcoholic beverage concentrates and syrups worldwide. It principally offers sparkling and still beverages. The company is member of the S&P 500, Dow Jones Industrials and the S&P Dividend Aristocrats indexes. Coca-Cola has paid uninterrupted dividends on its common stock since 1893 and increased payments to common shareholders every year for 47 years.
From the end of 1998 up until December 2008 this dividend growth stock has delivered a negative annual average total return of 2.10% to its shareholders. The stock has largely traded between $65 and $40 over the past decade.

The company has managed to deliver a 10.90% average annual increase in its EPS between 1999 and 2008. Analysts are expecting an increase in EPS to $3.05-$3.10 for 2009 and $3.25-$3.30 by 2010. This would be a nice increase from the 2008 earnings per share of $2.49. Future drivers for earnings could be the company’s tea, coffee and water operations. Cost savings initiatives could also add to the bottom line over time.
Some analysts believe that Coca Cola could follow arch rival Pepsi Co’s moves to acquire its own bottlers in an effort to gain more control over the production and distribution of its beverages in key markets. Coke holds a 35% interest in its largest manufacturer and distributor of Coca Cola products, Coca-Cola Enterprises In. (CCE). Coca-Cola Enterprises Inc. accounts for about 40% of Coke’s concentrate sales and 16% of the company’s worldwide volume, which makes it a likely target of acquisition, should Coca Cola decide to follow Pepsi Co’s strategy of buying back its bottling operations.

The Return on Equity has been in a decline after hitting a high in 2001. Rather than focus on absolute values for this indicator, I generally want to see at least a stable return on equity over time.

Annual dividends have increased by an average of 10.10% annually since 1999, which is slightly lower than the growth in EPS. The company last raised its dividend by 8% in February 2009, for the 47th year in a row.
A 10 % growth in dividends translates into the dividend payment doubling every seven years. If we look at historical data, going as far back as 1969, The Coca Cola Company has indeed managed to double its dividend payment every seven years on average.

The dividend payout ratio remained above 50% for the majority of the past decade. A lower payout is always a plus, since it leaves room for consistent dividend growth minimizing the impact of short-term fluctuations in earnings.

Currently Coca Cola is trading at 20 times earnings and yields 3.30%. In comparison arch rival in the cola wars Pepsi Co (PEP) trades at a P/E multiple of 16.5 and yields 3.40%. Check my analysis of Pepsi Co (PEP)

I believe that The Coca Cola Company is not as attractively valued at the moment as Pepsi Co. I would consider adding to my position there if it can cover its dividends at least two times by its earnings by the end of the year, and if the P/E ratio doesn’t increase above 20.

Full Disclosure: Long KO and PEP

Friday, June 19, 2009

Eli Lilly (LLY) Dividend Stock Analysis

Eli Lilly and Company engages in the discovery, development, manufacture, and sale of pharmaceutical products in the United States, Puerto Rico, and internationally. The company offers neuroscience products, endocrine products, oncology products, and cardiovascular agents for the treatment of various diseases. The company is member of the S&P Dividend Aristocrats index. Eli Lilly has paid uninterrupted dividends on its common stock since 1885 and increased payments to common shareholders every year for 42 years.
From the end of 1998 up until December 2008 this dividend growth stock has delivered a negative annual average total return of 5.40% to its shareholders. The stock has lost over two thirds of its value from its peak in 2000. The stock performance resembles the continued slide in Pfizer (PFE) stock right before the dividend cut in January 2009.


The company has managed to deliver an unimpressive 2.10% average annual increase in its EPS between 1999 and 2007. Earnings per share were a negative $1.89 due to several factors. One of the factors was a $4.46/share net impact associated with the acquisition of Imclone in 2008 for acquired IPR&D related to this acquisition. Another major item that affected earnings per share was a $1.20/share charge related to federal and state investigations regarding the drug Zyprexa. If it weren’t for these adjustments in earnings, adjusted EPS would have been $4.02, versus $3.54 in 2007. Analysts are expecting an increase in 2009 earnings per share to $4.20 and $4.50 by 2010. This is a rather steep increase from the range in which the stock’s earnings remained between 1999 and 2007. The most important factor for Elli Lilly and Co is their pipeline. The company’s future success depends upon its ability to discover and develop innovative new medicines that help people live longer, healthier, and more active lives.

The Return on Equity has been in a steep decline, falling from 54% in 1999 to 24% in 2007. Rather than focus on absolute values for this indicator, I generally want to see at least a stable return on equity over time.

Annual dividends have increased by an average of 8.20% annually since 1999, which is much higher than the growth in EPS.
An 8 % growth in dividends translates into the dividend payment doubling every eight years. If we look at historical data, going as far back as 1974, Eli Lilly Company has actually managed to double its dividend payment every seven years on average.

The dividend payout ratio remained above 50% since 2002. A lower payout is always a plus, since it leaves room for consistent dividend growth minimizing the impact of short-term fluctuations in earnings.

Currently Eli Lilly and Co is trading at 8.20 times 2009 earnings and yields 5.70%. In comparison Pfizer (PFE) trades at a P/E multiple of 12.5 and yields 4.30%, Merck (MRK) trades at a P/E multiple of 10 and yields 5.50%, while Novartis (NVS) trades at a P/E multiple 11.60 while yielding 4.30%.
I believe that the company will be attractively valued if it can cover its dividends at least two times by its earnings by the end of the year. While the high yield is tempting, I don’t like the declining returns on equity, high dividend payout ratio and the very slow growth in earnings over the past decade. I also don’t like the continued weakness in the stock over the past decade. It seems as if the market is pricing in something that few investors are considering. I would consider initiating a position at Eli Lilly & Co. when its 2009 earnings per share are posted and cover dividends at least by a factor of two.

Full Disclosure: None
Relevant Articles:

Friday, June 12, 2009

Clorox (CLX) Dividend Stock Analysis

The Clorox Company manufactures and markets a range of consumer products. The company is also member of the S&P Dividend Aristocrats index. This diversified maker of household cleaning, grocery and specialty food products is also a top manufacturer of natural personal care products.
Clorox has paid uninterrupted dividends on its common stock since it was spun out of Procter and Gamble (PG) in 1968 and increased payments to common shareholders every year for 31 years.
From the end of 1998 up until December 2008 this dividend growth stock has delivered an annual average total return of 1.70% to its shareholders. While the stock has largely remained flat for the majority of the past most of the returns came from reinvested dividends.

At the same time company has managed to deliver an impressive 13.60% average annual increase in its EPS since 1999. Analysts are expecting an increase in 2009 earnings per share to $3.80 and $4.15 by 2010.

The Return on Assets increased to 11% in 2008 from 6% in 1999. I used return on assets, since the stockholders equity portion of the balance sheet was negative after in 2004 Clorox exchanged its ownership in a subsidiary for approximately 29% of the company’s outstanding shares at the time of this transaction. In addition to that the company spent over 1.65 billion in share buybacks in 2007 and 2008.

Annual dividends have increased by an average of 8.60% annually since 1999, which is lower than the growth in EPS. Clorox has an ever-evolving dividend payment policy, which doesn’t stop the company from raising the annual distributions for 31 years in a row. There have been times such as in 2007 when dividend were raised twice while there are times such as 2003-2004 and 2000-2002 when dividends are not being raised for 6 to 9 quarters.
A 9 % growth in dividends translates into the dividend payment doubling every eight years. If we look at historical data, going as far back as 1983, The Clorox Company has actually managed to double its dividend payment every six years on average. The dividend is very well covered at the moment and is safe.

The dividend payout ratio remained above 50% until 2002. Since then the dividend payout ratio has consistently remained below 50%. A lower payout is always a plus, since it leaves room for consistent dividend growth minimizing the impact of short-term fluctuations in earnings.

Currently Clorox is trading at a P/E of 14 and yields 3.50%. I believe that the company is attractively valued at current levels and would consider adding to my position in the stock.

In comparison Procter & Gamble (PG) trades at a P/E multiple of 12 and yields 3.40%, Kimberly-Clark (KMB) trades at a P/E multiple of 13 and yields 4.70%, while Colgate Palmolive (CL) trades at a P/E multiple 18 while yielding 2.70%.

Full Disclosure: Long CLX, PG, and KMB

Relevant Articles:

- Procter & Gamble (PG) Dividend Stock Analysis
- Why do I like Dividend Aristocrats?
- The Rule of 72
- Johnson & Johnson (JNJ) Dividend Stock Analysis

Wednesday, June 10, 2009

Best International Dividend Stocks

In a previous article I provided a list with the best dividend stocks for the long run. Since the list included only US stocks several readers asked for a similar list with international dividend growth stocks instead. Furthermore, I am also looking to expand my portfolio to include at least some allocation to global dividend companies.

I do agree that in the globalized society of the 21st century it is important do be able to diversify your stock investments away from the US. By purchasing international stocks one essentially receives income in a different currency, which is a decent hedge against a possible devaluation of the US dollar. Another benefit of shopping for quality dividend stocks abroad is the huge potential for economic growth and development that both established and emerging economies posses.

There are some differences between US and international based dividend stocks. The first is that the dividend payments of foreign dividend stocks closely follow the earnings trend for the corporation. This is a problem for international dividend growth investors as it does not lead to a consistently increasing dividend income stream, which they are used to by investing in US companies. In the US companies are reluctant to cut dividends if the company had a bad year, while in Europe the dividends are more likely to be cut in response to short term fluctuations in earnings.

Another difference with global dividend stocks is that most pay dividends on an annual or semi-annual basis, which decreases the compounding effect of your payments. In addition to that, a certain percentage of your foreign dividends could be withheld directly from your payment, which decreases your income and makes individual dividend investing in a tax-deferred account inefficient. For example dividends paid from Canadian Companies to US investors are subject to a 15% withholding tax. The IRS however does give a tax credit for the current 15% Canadian withholding tax for foreign investors.
Different countries might have different taxation treaties for taxing dividends, thus you might consider hiring a good tax advisor.

Speaking of accounting matters, most foreign companies do not report results using the US GAAP but using IFRS. This could create material differences when analyzing foreign stocks, as there could be distortions in the amounts of net income, balance sheet values and cash flows.

In addition to that, most US based corporations have operations on a global scale, which derive a large portion of their revenues from abroad. I found that the ten stocks with the highest weights in the S&P 500 index derive about 44% of their aggregate financial contributions from foreign operations then the overall contribution to financial performance would be similar for the index as a whole. Thus an investor, who is simply invested in an S&P 500 index fund, is also properly diversified internationally. Adding any further international stocks could increase my international exposure, without adding any further incremental benefits.

I focused my study only on international stocks trading on the US exchanges. This does provide some limitations to the pool of available investments, but the risks to opening a non-US brokerage account in a foreign currency, paying taxes to foreign governments and paying higher brokerage fees for trades are not worth the incremental rewards for individual investors.

The companies I selected were foreign-based corporations, which have increased their dividends for at least five consecutive years. I tried creating a diversified list of foreign stocks, in order to avoid putting all my eggs in one basket.

Consumer Discretionary

SJR Shaw Communications Inc. (Cl B)
TRI Thomson Reuters Corporation

Consumer Staples

BTI British American Tobacco PLC (ADS)
CBY Cadbury PLC ADR
DEO Diageo (analysis)
UN/UL Unilever PLC/Unilever N.V.

Energy

BP BP PLC (ADS) (analysis)
ENB Enbridge Inc.
TK Teekay Corp.
TNP Tsakos Energy Navigation Ltd.
TRP TransCanada Corp.

Financials

BMO Bank of Montreal
BNS Bank of Nova Scotia
CM Canadian Imperial Bank of Commerce
MFC Manulife Financial Corp.
PRE PartnerRe Ltd.
TD Toronto-Dominion Bank (analysis)

Health Care

ACL Alcon Inc.
AZN AstraZeneca PLC (ADS)
FMS Fresenius Medical Care AG & Co. KGaA (ADS)
NVO Novo Nordisk A/S (ADS)

Industrials

MITSY Mitsui & Co. Ltd. (ADS)

Materials

BHP BHP Billiton Ltd. (ADS)
SQM Sociedad Quimica y Minera de Chile S.A. (ADS)

Telecommunication Services

NTT Nippon Telegraph & Telephone Corp. (ADS)
TEF Telefonica S.A. (ADS)
TU TELUS Corp.
VOD Vodafone Group PLC (ADS)

Utilities

NGG National Grid PLC (ADS)
VE Veolia Environnement (ADS)

The portfolio is not a recommendation to buy or sell any stocks, as it reflects my specific financial risk tolerance. Always do your own research before initiating a position in any financial instrument.

Full Disclosure: Long BP, TD and looking to enter other stocks mentioned here on dips

This post was featured on 209th Carnival of Personal Finance

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